Understanding white-tailed deer sensory abilities and movement ecology to mitigate deer-vehicle collisions: the value of long-term collaborative research – 2017. Proceedings of the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board.

 Jared, D. M., D. A. Osborn, G. J. D’Angelo, K. V. Miller, and R. J. Warren. 2017. Understanding white-tailed deer sensory abilities and movement ecology to mitigate deer-vehicle collisions: the value of long-term collaborative research. Proceedings of the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board. 14 pp. http://docs.trb.org/prp/17-00809.pdf

Deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs) are a nationwide concern resulting in loss of human lives and 48 financial loss from vehicle damage. Wildlife warning reflectors, vehicle-mounted sound 49 emitters, and roadside fences have been proposed to mitigate DVCs. However, these deterrents 50 have been marketed and implemented with little scientifically based testing of their efficacy, 51 especially in terms of how they are perceived by deer and how they do (or do not) alter deer 52 behaviors. This paper provides a detailed review of a 14-year collaborative research program 53 between Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) and university researchers designed to 54 investigate the sensory abilities of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and deer behavior 55 as a basis for testing methods for deterring deer from entering roadways. State highway 56 departments should consider the results of this empirical research before implementing vision- or 57 sound-based deterrents or roadside fencing. These results also will provide a basis for planning 58 additional research projects designed to mitigate DVCs in other states.

Email kmiller@warnell.uga.edu to request a copy